Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Ideal driving/seated position




Do yourself a favor. You don't need to correct postural issues in the gym.  You can do it throughout the day in the office, or driving to and from work.

Came across this picture in a new book I'm reading about creating a pain free back and improved posture. The book is called 8 Steps to a Pain Free Back by Esther Gokhale. (Thanks Nancy for letting me borrow it)

Beware of over exaggerating your lumbar spine while driving or flying (figure on left). Most car seats are designed to reflect the average posture, unfortunately they tend to be a bit too concave both vertically and horizontally. 

The figure on the right is the (suggested) ideal position, while attempting to elongate the spine and neck.

The process is called stretch-sitting. 

In summary...
  • Shift your butt back into the seat.
  • Lengthen your back against the car seat.
  • Roll your shoulders up, back then down into position (away from your ears).
  • Lengthen you neck, keeping your chin tucked.
5.18.11 Update based on Nancy's Comments...
"Think of it as keeping the chin lowered, not tucked. Semantics, really, and personal interpretation of the word 'tuck'! And the lengthening of the neck refers to the BACK of the neck. The ideal is to have it flat rather than curved. Essentially, strive for a continuous, straight spine all the way from your sacro-lumbar joint to your skull.
If you push down with your hands against the seat while you lengthen your spine upward, you can get a bit of feel-good traction going on in the spine.
Headrests are notorious for pushing the head too far forward. Compensate by placing a soft object (i.e.: a small, folded, hand towel) between the seat and your upper spine (the Stretchsit cushion is used in the picture, above, you can find those at the egwellness.com site for fifty buckeroos)."


1 comment:

  1. Nice summary, Jason. I would, however, think of it as keeping the chin lowered, not tucked. Semantics, really, and personal interpretation of the word 'tuck'! And the lengthening of the neck refers to the BACK of the neck. The ideal is to have it flat rather than curved. Essentially, strive for a continuous, straight spine all the way from your sacro-lumbar joint to your skull.

    If you push down with your hands against the seat while you lengthen your spine upward, you can get a bit of feel-good traction going on in the spine.

    Headrests are notorious for pushing the head too far forward. Compensate by placing a soft object (i.e.: a small, folded, hand towel) between the seat and your upper spine (the Stretchsit cushion is used in the picture, above, you can find those at the egwellness.com site for fifty buckeroos).

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